About Panic, and What To Do When Experiencing An Attack


We’ve all heard of panic. Maybe you’ve felt it – but just didn’t know how to label the feeling.

So what exactly is Panic? Maybe we start to define it by some of the ways that Panic presents:

  • Did you experience a fast heart rate or heart palpitations or a pounding heart?
  • Were you sweating?
  • Did you experience shaking or trembling?
  • Did you experience shortness of breath or difficulty breathing or sensations of
    smothering?
  • Did you feel like you were choking or like you couldn’t swallow?
  • Did you feel pain or discomfort or tightness in your chest?
  • Did you feel sick to your stomach or nauseous or feel other abdominal distress?
  • Did you feel dizzy, unsteady, lightheaded, or faint?
  • Did you experience feelings of unreality (derealization) or feelings of being
    detached from yourself (depersonalization)?
  • Did you fear that you would lose control or go crazy?
  • Were you afraid that you were dying?
  • Did you feel numbness or tingling sensations (paresthesias)?
  • Did you feel chills or hot flashes?

If these are starting to sound familiar, it could be that you’ve experienced a Panic Attack.

One of the best ways to combat it, is to have a handful of phrases memorized to be able to say to yourself during a panic attack

Here are some suggestions:

  • I am not going to die
  • The worst that will happen is that I’ll feel uncomfortable
  • I’ve lived through this before, I’ll make it again, I can ride this out just as I ride a wave into
    shore
  • I can do this and I will do this!
  • The worst that can happen is that I’ll panic
  • I will make it home!
  • I am a courageous person
  •  I’ll never get better if I keep running from the symptoms
  • It will pass
  •  I only ‘feel’ out of control, I’m actually in control

While these may work for some- they may or may not work for you. The goal is to find even just one or two phrases that resonate with you to say to yourself when you are going through an attack.

And please don’t be ashamed to talk to someone about the attacks, your triggers, and finding ways to move forward through it.

Photo by Nathan Cowley from Pexels